Meet The Students

Explore The Impact Of The Curieux Academic Journal 

Siddhant Jhawar

Student Researcher 

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Siddhant Jhawar is currently a rising junior at Daly College, Indore, India. Being an aficionado for the fields, Siddhant was motivated to write a multidisciplinary research paper on mathematics and macroeconomics, which focused on determining the relationship between crude oil prices and the Nigerian Economy.  He hopes to expand on his current research in college; wherein, he wishes to analyze whether the strong relationship is a result of Nigeria acting as a proxy for the economic boom in OPEC nations. 

 

Coming from an economically disadvantaged background, Siddhant has overcome many challenges and has worked hard to write a compelling research paper. His paper represents an outstanding study in the interdisciplinary relations between social sciences and mathematics. The Curieux Academic Journal was happy to help Siddhant in his journey and provide the necessary funding and resources to publish his work. 

 

James Nguyen

Student Researcher 

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James Nguyen is a current junior at La Quinta High school who is deeply interested in using biochemistry and biomedical engineering in the specific context of oncology. In his free time, you can find him reading self-help books, playing card games, or spending time with his family. In his research, James looked at the practical and economical effects of utilizing liquid biopsy markers for early cancer screening and monitoring. 

I started my research journey because my grandma was victimized by cancer and diagnosed with glioblastoma; if I can help scientists, no matter the scale, I would feel like I am using my time in a purposeful way. The battle for effective cancer treatment has been long and costly. If this continues, many will suffer like my  grandma and relatives will experience the indescribably bad feeling of witnessing it, like I did. To me, scientific research serves as a way to train my mind and make improvements in the world that will affect future generations. 

Kevin Chen

Student Researcher 

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Kevin Chen is a student at Cleveland STEM High School in Seattle, Washington. Fascinated by literature from a young age, he has been devoted to writing for as long as he can recall. He views writing as a powerful method of self-expression with the ability to amplify awareness toward global issues. In addition to his craft, he is an avid trumpetist in his school ensemble and enjoys traveling throughout Western Washington.

His article, “Disadvantageous Authority in Things Fall Apart”, is an analytical composition of Things Fall Apart, a novel by renowned author Chinua Achebe. It chronologically dissects a theme surrounding the main character’s egotism with three elaborative components: family, colonialism, and death. Each concept is then projected into morals surrounding global issues such as racism, sexism, and mental illnesses. 

Nora Kaizer

Student Researcher 

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 My name is Nora Kaizer and I attend Northeast Kings Education Centre in Canning, Nova Scotia, Canada. I have always had a passion for business and the economy which led me to conduct this research and pursue a degree in commerce at Queen's University in the upcoming years. In school, I love to challenge myself by taking advanced courses and french immersion. Aside from my courses, I dedicate a lot of my time to being student body president at my school, a Duke of Edinburgh Award leader as well as participate in many other clubs and activities. Outside of school, I love to play sports such as track and field, hockey, soccer, read books, spend time with friends and learn new things. 

I conducted this research because I have a passion for business and the economy as well as the environment. Looking into the future at how the economy must adapt to combat climate change, especially considering not much research has been conducted on recycled or remanufactured solar panels specifically, and that climate change has become a pressing issue over the past few decades, this research was conducted to create a starting point for a new, more sustainable economy to be introduced. 

Thomas Lin

Student Researcher 

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My name is Thomas Lin, and I am a grade 10 student at Ancaster High in Ontario, Canada. After moving to Canada when I was years old, I have overcome the language barrier and developed a passion in the social sciences – especially psychological research. I have found that many questions I have about life and its experiences can be answered through psychology. The angst that I developed through being an outsider as an immigrant in the first few years of such transition has made me go into the rabbit hole of psychology and (sometimes) philosophy. I hope that through scientific research, I can further develop my interest in psychology and eventually a career in the discipline.

Catherine Tang

Student Researcher 

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Hello! My name is Catherine Tang, and I am a senior at Glenbrook North High School in Illinois. My favorite thing to do in my free time is to wake up early and take photos of the sunrise. It’s not too great for my sleep schedule, but the results are definitely worth it. I am also a boba enthusiast and have a list of my favorite orders at each boba place. My bank account really hates that list, but there is no better feeling than taking a nice, refreshing sip of boba on a hot summer day.

 

I chose to conduct my research on the Boxer Rebellion because my family has an interesting connection to its aftermath. After a force of eight countries stormed Beijing after the collapse of the Qing dynasty, the US took the lead in negotiating the peace settlements. In a display of cooperation, both the US and China agreed to the creation of the Boxer Indemnity Scholarship Program, which sent Chinese students to study in American universities to promote intercultural understanding. To prepare the students, the Chinese government turned a royal garden into a preparatory school named Qinghua—my grandmother’s alma mater. While she never participated in the exchange program, it is still fascinating to learn about the history behind one of the top schools in China. If not for this project, I would have never known about my family’s connection to such a program.

Sofiia Skrypkar

Student Researcher 

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Hello! My name is Sofiia Skrypkar and I am from Tennessee. I love to play piano, watch documentaries, and spend time with my friends and family. When I was six, my family and I immigrated from Ukraine. Being an immigrant myself, I have always had an interest in learning about different immigrant experiences. This desire to learn more about a variety of immigrant backgrounds inspired my research and led to me to fall in love with the scientific research process. To me, scientific research is about looking deeper into the workings of our world and learning how we could make it a better place.  

Arshan Khatri

Student Researcher 

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Having a genetic disorder myself really makes me ponder over the Human body. The  intricacies and complexities of day-to-day function that we are so used to, I believe,  are enough to light up the room of awareness and introspection for me. I can relate to it  every single day; I see my life as a vivid example of what could go wrong even when a single  gene doesn’t do what it’s supposed to. I enjoy researching, listening to audiobooks, podcasts and more. My interest lies in  scientific research focused on Immunology and genetic diseases. My goal is to study  clinical investigation at Harvard Medical School. I’ll study biomedical sciences or clinical  research in my undergrad. 

 

From where I am—India—doing research and critical thinking is practically unheard of.  Growing out of that bubble and my interest in infectious diseases led me to conduct this  research. I wanted to understand how diseases spread and how trials are conducted. I  learned public behavior, the importance of scientific methods and a plethora of other  information. Scientific research is important to me because it helps to see the world intellectually.  Perhaps I can bring about a positive change in the realm of genetics and genetic disorders  through my passion in the subject; that is what keeps me moving forward.